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4 edition of Remittances and the Dutch disease found in the catalog.

Remittances and the Dutch disease

Pablo A. Acosta

Remittances and the Dutch disease

by Pablo A. Acosta

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  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in [Atlanta, Ga.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementPablo A. Acosta, Emmanuel K.K. Lartey, and Federico S. Mandelman.
SeriesWorking paper series / Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta -- 2007-8, Working paper series (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta : Online) -- 2007-8.
ContributionsLartey, Emmanuel K. K., Mandelman, Federico S., Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB1
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16289094M
LC Control Number2007615356

Remittances and the Dutch disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. A dynamic panel approach Emmanuel Owusu-Sekyere ∗, Reneé van Eyden and Francis M. Kemegue † Novem Abstract This paper investigates the effect of remittance inflows on .   We focus our study on whether rising levels of remittances result in the Dutch disease phenomenon in recipient economies. We find that, whether altruistically motivated or otherwise, an increase in remittances flows leads to a decline in labor supply and an increase in consumption demand that is biased toward nontradables. The increase in.

REMITTANCES, EXCHANGE RATE REGIMES, AND THE DUTCH DISEASE: A PANEL STUDY Emmanuel Lartey (California State University) Federico Mandelman (FRB Atlanta) Pablo Acosta (World Bank) BSP International Conference on Remittances, Manila, Philippines. March, Bangladesh has recorded better economic performance during last two decades, –, compared to earlier two decades, – The time-series analysis therefore uncovers some transition in the remittance impacts composed of the ‘Dutch Disease’ effect and the capital accumulation effect.

Remittances and the Dutch Disease 1Introduction The magnitude, as well as the growth rate, of remittances received by several developing countries has exceeded the inflow of official aid and private capital in recent years. In fact, the amount of remittances in was estimated at about % of GDP in the developing world. The Dutch-disease effect of remittances may be attributed to various channels. Being purely income transfers, remittances can lead to a spending effect increasing the consumption of both tradable and non-tradable goods. With prices of tradable goods essentially determined in.


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Remittances and the Dutch disease by Pablo A. Acosta Download PDF EPUB FB2

The results generally suggest that remittance inflows leads to the Dutch disease phenomenon under each of the cases considered. This is because, whether altruistically motivated or otherwise, an increase in remittances ultimately culminates in a rise in household income and, consequently, an increase in consumption that is biased toward non Cited by: The higher non-tradable prices serve as incentive for an expansion of that sector, culminating in reallocation of labor away from the tradable sector--a phenomenon known as the Dutch disease.

Quantitative results also indicate that remittances improve the welfare of households because they smooth income flows and increase consumption and. Journals & Books; Help Download PDF Download.

Share. Export. Advanced. Journal of International Economics. Vol Issue 1, SeptemberPages Remittances and the Dutch disease Cited by: Downloadable (with restrictions).

Remittances have grown in size and importance. They are also among the most stable inflows of scarce foreign exchange for the developing world. While such inflows can boost Remittances and the Dutch disease book growth, they can also appreciate domestic currency and thus, hurt exports – an unintended side effect commonly referred to as ‘the Dutch-disease phenomenon.

The Dutch disease effects of remittances in emerging economies with high remittance flows like the Philippines are well known (see, for example, Acosta, Lartey, and. Downloadable. Dutch disease or resource curse is an adverse effect of high dependence on exports of natural resources, such as oil and gas, or other inflows, such as remittances or foreign aid.

Dutch disease is known to lead to appreciation of the real exchange rate, decline in tradable sectors (mostly industry and agriculture) and surge in non-tradable sectors (services). In this article, using the VECM model we attempt to empirically examine the Dutch disease effect of remittances in Georgia.

The analyses are based on quarterly data covering the years – It is found that an inflow of remittances leads to an appreciation of the real effective exchange rate in the long run, whereas it has the reverse.

Dutch disease is an economic term for the negative consequences that can follow a spike in the value of a nation’s currency. It is primarily.

the Dutch disease aspect of migrant remittances to Pakistan using Bayesian analytical methods. Though the use of probabilistic approach is increasing in economic studies, particularly those dealing with macro and financial economics,1 this is to the best of our knowledge, the first application of the technique in a study of Dutch disease effects.

This study deals with the question of whether the inflow of migrant remittances causes Dutch Disease or not in India. For this purpose, the study employs the Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model (ARDL) to examine the influence of migrant remittances on the real effective exchange rate spanning the period of to On the long-run, the study finds the positive.

In this article, we examine the Dutch disease argument for Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka using a fixed effects model. We are unable to reject the null that there is a statistically significant appreciating effect of remittances on real exchange rate.

This study empirically investigated the short run and long run effects of remittances on real exchange rate. Further, it examined the impact of remittances on resource movement from tradable to non-tradable sector in the CFA franc and non-CFA zones of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

A panel based, Pooled Mean Group estimation technique was adopted to estimate the. received remittances lead to or not to the Dutch Disease, since the study deals with contrasting cases of Nepal and Bangladesh: they differ in their economic performances under their common dependence on remittances.

The technical contribution is the adoption of a VAR estimation for the Dutch Disease. Macroeconomic Impact of Remittances and the Dutch Disease in a Developing Country Fazle Rabbi, Mamta B. Chowdhury, Mohammad Z.

Hasan* University of Notre Dame Australia, Australia. Abstract. The magnitude of the flow of remittances to a developing country like Bangladesh and their rate of growth has become a significant factor in its economy.

economic expansion and the phenomenon of Dutch Disease (Soto, ). In many countries remittances exceed the inflow of both foreign aid and private capital.

Indeveloping countries received $ billion in remittances, which is % higher than figures; and in remittances represented. Workers' remittances and Dutch Disease in Bangladesh.

Mamta B. Chowdhury and Fazle Rabbi () The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development,vol. 23, issue 4, Abstract: Workers' remittance is one of the major sources of foreign exchange earnings for Bangladesh in recent years.

It accounted for 12% of GDP in and has. A main conclusion is that remittances give rise to a sort of Dutch Disease effect and thereby have an adverse effect on the competitiveness of the tradable sector.

The magnitude of. ABSTRACT Workers' remittance is one of the major sources of foreign exchange earnings for Bangladesh in recent years. It accounted for 12% of GDP in and has colossal socio-economic implications for the country.

However, the inflows of. grants™remittance transfers, not the size of the diaspora or the density of its networks, to trade-enhancing activities in home countries. It also contributes to the remittances and Dutch disease literature as it is a direct investigation of the e⁄ect of remittances on the relative growth of tradable.

Remittances and the Real Exchange Rate: Are There Reasons to Be Concerned about Dutch Disease in Latin America?" mimeo,W o r l dB a n k. The development impact of workers’ remittances in Latin America.

The Macro-Economic Impact of Remittances in Latin America: Dutch Disease or Latin Cure?" mimeo, Inter-American. Remittances and the Dutch Disease. Pablo A. Acosta, Emmanuel K.K. Lartey, and Federico S. Mandelman Working Paper a Revised August Download the .similar to the effects of the Dutch disease.

A similar argument is put forward by Burgess and Haksar () when they note that remittance income could reduce the recipient’s need to work. Cross-country research has also found evidence of the Dutch disease in some remittance-receiving countries.

This paper focuses on two dimensions of the.Remittances and the Dutch disease. Pablo Acosta (), Emmanuel Lartey and Federico Mandelman (). Journal of International Economics,vol. 79, issue 1, Abstract: Using data for El Salvador and Bayesian techniques, we develop and estimate a two-sector dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model to analyze the effects of remittances on .